Phone: (630) 522-0855 - Email: info@situatedresearch.com
This Video Game Knows When You’re Scared–And Gets Scarier

This Video Game Knows When You’re Scared–And Gets Scarier

  • February 18, 2014

The director behind the innovative video game Nevermind tells us why biofeedback is the new frontier in gaming.

In the future, horror games will know when you’re scared. And then they’ll get scarier.

Proof: the currently-in-development horror-adventure game Nevermind, which just launched a Kickstarter campaign last week. The game pairs classic first-person exploration with biofeedback data from a heart rate monitor in order to tell when you’re scared and turn up the horror.

Read More
IBM Forecasts Major Advances In Cognitive Computing

IBM Forecasts Major Advances in Cognitive Computing

  • December 27, 2013

IBM on Tuesday released its annual “5 in 5” list of predictions about technological innovations that will change the way we live in the next five years, with the theme this year being cognitive advances in computing that help machines “learn” how to better serve us. 

Read More
How Google Is Melding Our Real And Virtual Worlds With Games, Apps … And Glass

How Google is Melding Our Real and Virtual Worlds with Games, Apps … and Glass

  • May 20, 2013

“The world around you is not what it seems,” says Ingress, the virtual game that uses the real world as its gamespace. And, perhaps, when Google’s semi-independent division Niantic Labs is finished with its mission, we humans won’t be, either.

Google’s mission is to organize the world’s information and make it universally accessible and usable. Note carefully that Google says nothing about the Internet in that statement. 

Read More
Teaching Video Game Characters Natural Body Language

Teaching Video Game Characters Natural Body Language

  • August 22, 2012

Video game characters with natural responses to human body language

Researchers at Goldsmiths, University of London have been using theater performers to design computer software capable of reading and replicating the way in which humans communicate with their bodies.

Dr Marco Gillies from the Department of Computing has made virtual characters more believable by enlisting actors to teach them body movement. The actors interact with members of the public through a screen, and their responses to specific body language are memorized as algorithms by the software.

Read More
Creating The Illusion Of Emotion Or Why You Care About Ones And Zeroes

Creating the Illusion of Emotion or Why You Care About Ones and Zeroes

  • March 19, 2012

As much as you may love video games and the stories they help you tell, it’s impossible to escape the fact that much of your experience is a trick of the mind.

The thing that separates video games from other forms of media, the ability to interact with and perhaps shape a virtual world, is mostly powered by the artificial intelligence of the characters that populate that experience.

But at its best gaming artificial intelligence systems, AI expert David Mark says, are, like 2-year-olds, basically sociopaths. What he means is that they are intrinsically anti-social. Getting past that problem doesn’t mean imbuing a character with personality, it means tricking gamers.

Read More
Microsoft’s Vision For Future Productivity

Microsoft’s Vision for Future Productivity

  • November 12, 2011

From Microsoft’s Office YouTube Channel:

Watch how future technology will help people make better use of their time, focus their attention, and strengthen relationships while getting things done at work, home, and on the go. (Release: 2011)

There are some interesting concepts in the video involving augmented reality (adding visualizations to one’s environment), new user interfaces and user collaboration, and “Web 3.0” style communication: where relevant information finds the user at the appropriate time (an intelligent filtering of the overwhelming information now being generated by “Web 2.0” technologies such as social media).

Read More
Sony Says Games Will Read Emotions In 10 Years

Sony Says Games Will Read Emotions in 10 Years

  • August 28, 2011

Sony is talking crazy, indicating that games may be able to tell if you’re lying or depressed just ten years down the road. We’ll stick with growing crops, thanks.

Seriously, when do games stop being games and cross over into virtual reality? This was the question I asked Nvidia months ago at ECGC 2011, and was told there will always be a market for the high-end PC gamer with the rig nearly the size of a bookcase. But putting visual realism aside, what will happen when games suddenly stop acting like games, and become more like a self-aware super AI that could possibly one day sing you happy birthday or annihilate the human race?

Read More
For IBM’s Watson Technology, What Happens After “Jeopardy!”?

For IBM’s Watson technology, What Happens After “Jeopardy!”?

  • February 14, 2011

 

IBM’s Supercomputer Has Implications for Healthcare, Information Tech and More

Wouldn’t it be nice to have your very own supercomputer in your pocket?

If your laptop crashed while you were working on a major presentation, you could ask your portable expert to help diagnose the problem. If you wanted to bone up on Middle Eastern history, you could ask it to comb every document available and then wrap it all up in a simple summary (annotated, of course).

Read More
Search