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The Psychology Principles Every UI/UX Designer Needs To Know

The Psychology Principles Every UI/UX Designer Needs to Know

  • November 14, 2017

Psychology plays a big part in a user’s experience with an application. By understanding how our designs are perceived, we can make adjustments so that the apps we create are more effective in achieving the goals of the user.

To help you understand the perception of the user, I will introduce some design principles which I think are the most important, and also provide common examples of these principles in practice.

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The Extra Effort For Great UX

The Extra Effort for Great UX

  • December 7, 2015

One of the best books I’ve ever read on User Experiences is titled “The Elements of User Experience” written by Jesse James Garrett. In the book, he begins by telling the story of a man who wakes up and wonders why his alarm clock never went off. He goes to make coffee, but struggles with the coffeemaker. On his way to work, he stops for gas, but can’t get his credit card to work and has to stand in a long line to pay. When he is finally on his way, he is detoured due to an accident and arrives far later than he ever anticipated. He ends up irritated, sweaty, and lacking a much needed cup of coffee. 

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How To Fix A Bad User Interface

How to Fix a Bad User Interface

  • September 25, 2015

Hey! This is an excerpt from my book Designing Products People Lovewhich will be published by O’Reilly in December. Learn more about the book and the 20+ product designers from Facebook, Twitter, Slack, etc. who were interviewed about how they work.

Have you ever experienced a user interface that feels lifeless? Have you created a UI that just seems to be missing…something

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Scarcity Principle: Making Users Click RIGHT NOW Or Lose Out

Scarcity Principle: Making Users Click RIGHT NOW or Lose Out

  • October 14, 2014

Summary: Feeling that there is only one chance can convince people to take action sooner, sometimes without careful consideration of consequences or alternative options.

The scarcity principle is a well-documented social-psychology phenomenon that causes people to assign high value to things they perceive as being less available.

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London Firm Creates Mind-Controlled Commands For Google Glass

London Firm Creates Mind-Controlled Commands for Google Glass

  • July 15, 2014

Forget voice commands and touch gestures: A London firm has developed a way for Google Glass users to control their devices just by thinking.

This Place, an agency that specializes in creating user interfaces and experiences for programs used in the medical industry, developed a software called MindRDR that allows Google Glass to connect with the Neurosky MindWave Mobile EEG biosensor, a head-mounted device that can detect a person’s brain waves. 

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Study Reveals Real Reason Behind Gaming Aggression

Study Reveals Real Reason Behind Gaming Aggression

  • April 23, 2014

A new study has revealed that gamers are more likely to experience feelings of aggression from playing a game when it is too difficult or when the controls are too complicated to master.

In comparison, the research found there was “little difference” in levels of aggression when the games themselves depicted violence. Overwhelmingly, the deciding factor was “how the volunteers were able to master the electronic game after 20 minutes of play”. 

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This Video Game Knows When You’re Scared–And Gets Scarier

This Video Game Knows When You’re Scared–And Gets Scarier

  • February 18, 2014

The director behind the innovative video game Nevermind tells us why biofeedback is the new frontier in gaming.

In the future, horror games will know when you’re scared. And then they’ll get scarier.

Proof: the currently-in-development horror-adventure game Nevermind, which just launched a Kickstarter campaign last week. The game pairs classic first-person exploration with biofeedback data from a heart rate monitor in order to tell when you’re scared and turn up the horror.

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From Myst To GTA V: Rockstar Nails The Branching Narrative

From Myst to GTA V: Rockstar Nails the Branching Narrative

  • September 30, 2013

What stands out about the latest release in the Grand Theft Auto series is the overwhelming size of the game’s map and storyline. However, after playing the game for a while, it becomes apparent that Rockstar Games has done an excellent job at balancing the game by utilizing multiple characters to provide just enough open-endedness for players to explore, while also constraining in-game activities with careful narrative design to keep engagement high during gameplay. 

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Neuroscience Explores Why Humans Feel Empathy For Robots

Neuroscience Explores Why Humans Feel Empathy for Robots

  • April 24, 2013

If, while watching WALL-E, your heart broke just a little bit when you saw the title character desperately travel across outer space in search of true love, it doesn’t mean you’re crazy. Sure, WALL-E is a robot. But its cute, anthropomorphized look and all too human desire to end its loneliness made us subconsciously forget that it is not human.

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Teaching Video Game Characters Natural Body Language

Teaching Video Game Characters Natural Body Language

  • August 22, 2012

Video game characters with natural responses to human body language

Researchers at Goldsmiths, University of London have been using theater performers to design computer software capable of reading and replicating the way in which humans communicate with their bodies.

Dr Marco Gillies from the Department of Computing has made virtual characters more believable by enlisting actors to teach them body movement. The actors interact with members of the public through a screen, and their responses to specific body language are memorized as algorithms by the software.

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