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The Psychology Principles Every UI/UX Designer Needs To Know

The Psychology Principles Every UI/UX Designer Needs to Know

  • November 14, 2017

Psychology plays a big part in a user’s experience with an application. By understanding how our designs are perceived, we can make adjustments so that the apps we create are more effective in achieving the goals of the user.

To help you understand the perception of the user, I will introduce some design principles which I think are the most important, and also provide common examples of these principles in practice.

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What Is Card Sorting?

What is Card Sorting?

  • October 16, 2017

Card Sorting is a method used to help design or evaluate the Information Architecture (IA) of a system. In a card sorting session, participants organize topics into categories that make sense to them and they may also help you label these groups. To conduct a card sort, you can use actual cards, pieces of paper, or one of several online card-sorting software tools. 

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Capturing Feedback In A User’s Natural Environment

Capturing Feedback in a User’s Natural Environment

  • August 25, 2017

Remote usability testing allows you to conduct user research with participants in their natural environment by employing screen-sharing software or online remote usability vendor services.  You will be amazed how powerful a quick test with remote users is at discovering where your design needs to go.

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What Do Your Customers Think Of Your Product?

What Do Your Customers Think of Your Product?

  • July 24, 2017

In order to improve the user experience, you have to start by observing customers interacting with your product.

The first step to improving your own UX (and reaping the business benefits) is to conduct a usability assessment of your product, software or website. This process uncovers the most common problems. Often, usage analytics indicate UX issues with your product. Usability testing explains these issues. 

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Tips On Improving Your Website’s User Experience, Part 2

Tips on Improving Your Website’s User Experience, Part 2

  • February 2, 2017

Last week we published an article on the first five tips on improving your website’s user experience. Today we want to continue with that same theme and provide the final five tips.

This list is a starting point to providing the user experience that you want to give your customers online. Remember, if users come to your website and have trouble finding information or ordering a product, they will often leave your website and you will lose their business. 

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Tips On Improving Your Website’s User Experience, Part 1

Tips on Improving Your Website’s User Experience, Part 1

  • January 26, 2017

Websites are a representation of your business and your products or services offered. That is why it is so important to give your users a great experience no matter how they interact with your business.

Our team has come up with ten usability guidelines for web developers and business owners to follow. This list is a starting point to providing the user experience that you want to give your customers online.

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6 Things That Take Your UX From Above Average To World Class

6 Things That Take Your UX from Above Average to World Class

  • October 28, 2016

Many parts of applications are rarely experienced, yet we have to consider how the presence or absence of these states affect a user’s experience. It’s the UX designer’s job to go beyond visual design and make the best experience possible—including all the parts of the experience that nobody thinks to design. 

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UX Reality Check: 14 Hard Truths About Users

UX Reality Check: 14 Hard Truths About Users

  • May 27, 2016

It can be hard for designers to take a step back and look at an app or website through users’ eyes. Here’s where to start.

After any amount of time in the design industry, you’ll most certainly hear someone refer to users as “dumb.” People talk about having to “dumb down” interfaces, design for “the lowest common denominator,” and try to make applications “idiot-proof.”

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